How to transplant vinca minor

how to transplant vinca minor

Vinca Minor (Periwinkle) Plant Profile

Dig a hole for the transplant that is as deep as the height of the soil ball. Choose a location with well-draining soil in partial sun to full shade. Add organic matter, such as compost, leaf mold. How to Transplant Vinca Minor Step 1. Untangle the vines of the Vinca from the surrounding plants and identify the root ball area of the individual Step 2. Define and dig out a perimeter around each rooted Vinca plant at least five inches from the main root stem. Step 3. Slide the trowel down at.

Department of Agriculture plant hardiness zones 4 through 9, periwinkle Vinca minor lends its characteristic baby blue, white or violet flowers and glossy green leaves to gardens and lawns as an ornamental plant or an attractive and hardy ground cover that spreads by long shoots. Whether you're transplanting periwinkle from an indoor container to an outdoor bed or moving the plants from one location to another in your garden, the process is fairly painless. Wait until the soil is workable to transplant your periwinkle to an outdoor location.

Avoid planting if the soil is cold or hard. Summer, autumn and early spring typically serve as the ideal times for transplanting periwinkle outdoors.

Choose the right location for your periwinkle. This plant prefers full sunlight or partial shade and moist, well-draining soil rich in organic matter. Although it's not picky about soil type, periwinkle thrives in soils with a pH range of 6. Equip yourself with a pair of gardening gloves and use how to draw a bass fish easy garden trowel to dig holes to accommodate the size of your periwinkle plants.

Allow each periwinkle plant at least 18 inches of space. Set aside loose soil taken from what is a bluebirds habitat holes. Dig up the entire root system of each periwinkle plant you wish to transplant, carefully working around the perimeter of each plant with the garden trowel if necessary.

You may be able to simply lift the root ball of a potted plant, depending on the size of the periwinkle. Place the root ball of each periwinkle in its new location, setting the roots in the prepared hole. Firm the loose soil around the root ball upon transplanting. Water the plant slowly and deeply after firming the soil, saturating the entire root system. Dan Ketchum has been a professional writer sincewith work appearing online and offline in Word Riot, Bazooka Magazine, Anemone Sidecar, Trails and more.

Dan's diverse professional background spans from costume design and screenwriting to mixology, manual labor and video game industry publicity. By Dan Ketchum. Related Articles. Periwinkle may spread aggressively among other plants. While this makes it great for ground cover, keep this in mind when transplanting periwinkle outdoors to prevent it from crowding out your other plants -- periwinkle can spread out to occupy as much as 6 inches of soil space per year.

A Popular Ground Cover

Place the root ball of each periwinkle in its new location, setting the roots in the prepared hole. Firm the loose soil around the root ball upon transplanting. Water the plant slowly and deeply. Mar 27,  · Transplanting some vinca minor (periwinkle) that I started from cuttings last ebrovary.com, low-maintenance, and pest-free, Vinca minor has pretty broadleaf fo. Periwinkle (aka myrtle or Vinca minor) roots as it creeps, so all you have to do is dig up runners that already have rooted. Pieces that have roots can be transplanted immediately to the bare.

Vinca minor, also known as lesser periwinkle and creeping myrtle, grows in U. Department of Agriculture plant hardiness zones 4 through Lesser periwinkle features dense groundcover foliage and light blue, star-shaped flowers with squared tips.

You can plant lesser periwinkle to control erosion on steep slopes or to fill space in a border flower bed. This fast-growing plant quickly fills in open spaces, making it a top choice for landscaping recently excavated land and new flower beds. You can dig up lesser periwinkle from an existing patch and transplant it to other areas of your garden. Wait until early spring or autumn when weather is cool before digging and transplanting lesser periwinkle. Brush back some of the foliage to reveal the stems and trace a healthy stem back to the ground, indicating the location of a root.

Cut a complete circle around the stem with a small garden trowel, digging about 3 inches away from the stem and 3 to 4 inches deep. Pry the plant out of the ground, leaving as much of the soil ball intact as possible. Dig a hole for the transplant that is as deep as the height of the soil ball. Choose a location with well-draining soil in partial sun to full shade. Add organic matter, such as compost, leaf mold and grass clippings, and if a home soil test kit indicates neutral or alkaline soil, add iron sulfate to increase soil acidity for lesser periwinkle.

Plant the transplant in the hole and push soil around the root ball, packing the soil firmly, but not tightly around the roots. Plant multiple lesser periwinkle transplants only a few inches apart in order to cover an area in a short amount of time.

Water the plant to keep the soil moist, but not wet, for the first week or two after planting while the vinca minor plant establishes itself. After a couple weeks, keep the soil slightly dry, only watering about once weekly except in periods of extreme drought. Apply a complete fertilizer or finished compost around the plant, if desired, to boost plant growth; this is not required for lesser periwinkles because of their fast growth and running habit. A former cake decorator and competitive horticulturist, Amelia Allonsy is most at home in the kitchen or with her hands in the dirt.

She received her Bachelor's degree from West Virginia University. Her work has been published in the San Francisco Chronicle and on other websites. By Amelia Allonsy. Related Articles. Lesser periwinkle has a tendency to spread to unwanted areas, so you might want to use a border or plant the groundcover only in controlled areas of the garden to prevent invasion.

Use lesser periwinkle as a groundcover around the base of trees where they can receive ample shade. Don't confuse lesser periwinkle with its close relative, big periwinkle Vinca major , which is widely known for its moderate invasiveness that can quickly escape cultivation and spread to other undesired areas throughout your property.

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